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Author Topic: WHAT YEAR MOKE  (Read 778 times)

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smokeymokey

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WHAT YEAR MOKE
« on: June 04, 2016, 05:56:57 PM »
 :-\

Hi All,

so sooo close to becoming a fully pledged Moker well once i purchase one lol with you guys being in the know WHAT YEAR do you guys recommend  after lots of reading is 1981 1982 years of manufacture the best way to go  ???

Cheers Shane

Newie

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2016, 11:55:59 PM »
Hi Shane,

Welcome to the Forum and good luck with the hunt for your Moke.

I've moved the post into the Moke Chat board as this is the place for a general question such as you have asked.


Everyone has their own thoughts on which model Mokes are the best, and they did tend to improve as the years went on, but my own opinion is that you are better off not getting hung up on looking for a particular model, but rather concentrate on getting a good example of whatever model happens to be on offer.

Whilst there are variations on the theme, to simplify things Mokes can be divided into three main model variants:

1966 - 68 - Little Wheelers. These may be the exception to the above rule in that they are a bit different. More basic than the later Mokes and the 10" wheels can be an acquired taste. Some people love them, but not necessarily what most people think of as a "typical" Moke. Less popular than the others when it comes time to move it on.

1968 - 79 - Non galvanised "Big Wheelers". These are your common or garden variety Moke  :). Most have been played around with that much by now that the improvements Leyland made throughout this period are often irrelevant. One thing I'm a big fan of which is hard to change from an owner's point of view is the removable grille which came in around '76 I think. It doesn't sound important, but it makes working on them much easier. Other than that, the main changes related to engine size, gearbox types, and seat types. Any or all of these have quite likely been changed by previous owners anyway, so best to assess each Moke on it's individual merits as you find it.

1980 - 83 - Galvanised "Big Wheelers". These are commonly referred to as Gal Mokes or 80's Mokes. Rust is of course a major issue with all Mokes, which is why Leyland changed to galvanised bodies in the 80's. Don't be fooled into thinking they are rust proof though. The galvanising certainly helps, but there are still a lot of critically rusted Gal Mokes out there, and a lot of rust free Non gal ones (well a few anyway  :) ).
Apart from the galvanising though, 80's Mokes do have a few more mod cons than their predecessors such as adjustable seats, a bigger side fill fuel tank, a better heater, twin steering column stalks and a few other bits and pieces. Nothing that you can't retrofit to a 70's Moke though (aside from maybe the fuel tank).


In summary, the 80's Mokes are certainly very nice, but harder to find and possibly more expensive than the others and by no means guaranteed to be in better condition, so by all means keep an eye out for one, but don't be afraid to have a serious look at the 70's versions as well.


Moke 71

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2016, 04:12:34 AM »
The other thing to consider is if you are looking at historic rego, here in SA it needs to pre 1979 to qualify, not sure of other states.
Moke 1971
Moke 1976 - Daily
Moke 1978 Californian
Moke 1979 - AKA Thomas
and too many round nose minis

smokeymokey

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2016, 10:50:21 AM »
Thanks Newie

 legend mate so well put for a newbie like myself big thumbs up and many  thanks for going to the trouble and for the warm welcome.

Cheers Shane

Hi Shane,

Welcome to the Forum and good luck with the hunt for your Moke.

I've moved the post into the Moke Chat board as this is the place for a general question such as you have asked.


Everyone has their own thoughts on which model Mokes are the best, and they did tend to improve as the years went on, but my own opinion is that you are better off not getting hung up on looking for a particular model, but rather concentrate on getting a good example of whatever model happens to be on offer.

Whilst there are variations on the theme, to simplify things Mokes can be divided into three main model variants:

1966 - 68 - Little Wheelers. These may be the exception to the above rule in that they are a bit different. More basic than the later Mokes and the 10" wheels can be an acquired taste. Some people love them, but not necessarily what most people think of as a "typical" Moke. Less popular than the others when it comes time to move it on.

1968 - 79 - Non galvanised "Big Wheelers". These are your common or garden variety Moke  :). Most have been played around with that much by now that the improvements Leyland made throughout this period are often irrelevant. One thing I'm a big fan of which is hard to change from an owner's point of view is the removable grille which came in around '76 I think. It doesn't sound important, but it makes working on them much easier. Other than that, the main changes related to engine size, gearbox types, and seat types. Any or all of these have quite likely been changed by previous owners anyway, so best to assess each Moke on it's individual merits as you find it.

1980 - 83 - Galvanised "Big Wheelers". These are commonly referred to as Gal Mokes or 80's Mokes. Rust is of course a major issue with all Mokes, which is why Leyland changed to galvanised bodies in the 80's. Don't be fooled into thinking they are rust proof though. The galvanising certainly helps, but there are still a lot of critically rusted Gal Mokes out there, and a lot of rust free Non gal ones (well a few anyway  :) ).
Apart from the galvanising though, 80's Mokes do have a few more mod cons than their predecessors such as adjustable seats, a bigger side fill fuel tank, a better heater, twin steering column stalks and a few other bits and pieces. Nothing that you can't retrofit to a 70's Moke though (aside from maybe the fuel tank).


In summary, the 80's Mokes are certainly very nice, but harder to find and possibly more expensive than the others and by no means guaranteed to be in better condition, so by all means keep an eye out for one, but don't be afraid to have a serious look at the 70's versions as well.

Newie

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2016, 10:51:15 AM »
The other thing to consider is if you are looking at historic rego, here in SA it needs to pre 1979 to qualify, not sure of other states.

That's a bit of and odd regulation Dave. Here in NSW they have to be at least 30 years old, which lets you register anything built before June 1986 at the moment. Is 1979 set as a fixed year, or do they have to be more than 37 years old to qualify?

It must be a sign that I'm getting old, but 30 year old cars don't seem that old anymore. I was somewhat shocked horrified surprised to see an '80s Magna on Historic plates at a recent club run  :-X

Newie

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2016, 10:55:55 AM »
Thanks Newie

 legend mate so well put for a newbie like myself big thumbs up and many  thanks for going to the trouble and for the warm welcome.

Cheers Shane

No problem Shane. I know it's all very confusing when you start out.

All of the above is of course only my opinion and I'm sure others will disagree with some points or have something else to add which I may have missed, but it gives you somewhere to start at least.


Newie

smokeymokey

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2016, 10:59:08 AM »
Luckily in Vic mate but wow 79 thats crazy a vehicle thats roadworthy and is over 25 years old qualifies over here on a what they call a club permit scheme unto 90 days reg.drive whenever you want wherever you want but you must be a member of a club which is no biggy gives you an excuse to mingle and talk car stuff etc.
And over 30 years you can go full rego.if its left hand drive.
The other thing to consider is if you are looking at historic rego, here in SA it needs to pre 1979 to qualify, not sure of other states.

Pete Power

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2016, 03:03:17 PM »
In June 2011 the Historic Reg in SA changed from the previous 30 year old rule, to only pre 1979.
Unless you currently held Historic Reg on a post 79 car. I made it by 4 months.

But the best Moke to get is a rust free one.
Happy Mokin
Regards
Pete

1981 Californian 1275 Galv "Mighty Moke"

"Just because you're breathing doesn't mean you're alive!"

Moke 71

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2016, 06:05:29 PM »
That's a bit of and odd regulation Dave. Here in NSW they have to be at least 30 years old, which lets you register anything built before June 1986 at the moment. Is 1979 set as a fixed year, or do they have to be more than 37 years old to qualify?

It must be a sign that I'm getting old, but 30 year old cars don't seem that old anymore. I was somewhat shocked horrified surprised to see an '80s Magna on Historic plates at a recent club run  :-X

Newie

SA wanted to keep the Commodores out, Thomas is a 79 but I already had that historic rego before the rules changed which was the same as PP. at the end of the day post 78 mokes suddenly were not that popular here.
Moke 1971
Moke 1976 - Daily
Moke 1978 Californian
Moke 1979 - AKA Thomas
and too many round nose minis

smokeymokey

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2016, 07:10:48 PM »
Its a bit harsh to not allow a particular make but IMO I couldn't agree more just the other day I saw  a clapped out  Volvo with club reg.this type of how I see it exploitation of the government being somewhat understanding and lenient to us car guys could and probably is why changes that I have heard whisper about is things are about to change quite a bit with club permit scheme rules  :'(
If someone is down on their luck financially and do it for cheap Reg. I totally understand but most are may be just taking advantage of it at the moment..

So Moke 71 if you with your knowledge of Mokes know what year /years what would be your ultimate choice since below 78 were less desirable?

Cheers Shane..

SA wanted to keep the Commodores out, Thomas is a 79 but I already had that historic rego before the rules changed which was the same as PP. at the end of the day post 78 mokes suddenly were not that popular here.

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2016, 07:29:09 PM »
Any running Moke is good Moke. Although I do like a removable grill but mokes without a removable are just a little more of challenge. Some will say 79 was a bad year as Leyland got the galvanise mix wrong and it went pear shape. Sure my 79 has rust but it is my strongest Moke that I take anywhere and we have a lot of history and I am a little fond of what he has done over the years.

Just set about building a reliable Moke, one that you can get in, turn the key and drive and know when it is telling you to bled the clutch, get a wheel alignment etc. it's hard to explain but once you know your Moke your will build a relationship with it and you will know when it wants some attention.

my mokes are not the prettiest but I never claim they are, I just focus on driving them rain hail and shine.

At the end of the day, I would choose a big wheeler with an 1100 and disc brakes, but just my opinion and plenty of others out there that have other thoughts.

Cheers Dave
Moke 1971
Moke 1976 - Daily
Moke 1978 Californian
Moke 1979 - AKA Thomas
and too many round nose minis

Holoholo

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2016, 08:48:47 PM »
I couldn't agree more. I went into the Moke purchase with rose coloured glasses - on line every Moke looked really cool - especially as the weather warmed up. Along the way, I got a lot of good advice, including being prepared to put at least 100% of my purchase price back into the car again to end up with something reliable. In the end it came down to finding something that hadn't had a whole lot of owners who tried to make it something it wasn't, was relatively rust free and someone who knew a lot more about them than me said it was a good place to start my Moke journey. No different than making a rescue dog part of the family - it may have a chequered history, but with a bit of thought about your needs and what you are prepared to put into it - it can be a great experience.

jimwat

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Re: WHAT YEAR MOKE
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2018, 10:21:48 PM »
Just reading the info posted a couple of years ago on SA Historic rego. Not sure if it has been updated on another thread so thought it was worth posting here as an update. This link:

https://www.sa.gov.au/topics/driving-and-transport/vehicles-and-registration/conditional-registration/historic-left-hand-drive-and-street-rod-vehicles

has more details but the below definition is the relevant update which has eliminated the former 1979 rule referred to in this thread.

Historic vehicle
A motor vehicle is a historic vehicle if 30 years or more have elapsed since 1 January of the year in which the vehicle was manufactured.
Jim