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Author Topic: Pedal pivot pin  (Read 292 times)

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Tim

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Pedal pivot pin
« on: February 15, 2019, 05:15:14 PM »
The big pedal pivot pin that passes through the pedal box is getting a bit tired on my Moke. It turn out that its a part that is unique to later model Australian Minis and Mokes and is difficult to get from the local suppliers. The earlier version has a sort of flat teardrop shaped plate instead of a head, whereas the later one has a hex head. Does anyone know if the early one can be substituted for the later one, or do they have different dimensions?

thanks
Tim
1951 Morris Commercial J Type Van
1955 BSA C11G
1961 Morris Mini Traveller
1969 Triumph TR6R
1977 Leyland Moke Californian

Driving a Moke with a hardtop is like having a shower in a raincoat.

winabbey

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Pete Power

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2019, 10:30:00 AM »
Hi Tim,
 Something I always thought would be a good improvement would be do drill the pin out and fit a grease nipple in the end with a couple of cross holes central to each pedal.

Pete
Happy Mokin
Regards
Pete

1981 Californian 1275 Galv "Mighty Moke"

"Just because you're breathing doesn't mean you're alive!"

Tim

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2019, 11:22:14 AM »
Mini Kingdom are awaiting new stock from the supplier. I reckon they are made locally rather than being imported from the UK. Mini Sport seem to be the only other place that lists them list, but they're $95.

You're probably right Pete. although the interesting things with this one is that it isn't terrible where the pedals rotate on the shaft, but there's a groove worn into it just under the head where it passes through the side of the pedal box. Its able to move around when you press the pedals in. I might have to try to weld the groove up and grind it to size. I wish I had a lathe.

Tim
1951 Morris Commercial J Type Van
1955 BSA C11G
1961 Morris Mini Traveller
1969 Triumph TR6R
1977 Leyland Moke Californian

Driving a Moke with a hardtop is like having a shower in a raincoat.

winabbey

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2019, 12:44:02 PM »
I wonder if they used copper grease on original assembly? A good dollop of that on the moving parts when assembling would surely help.

Tim

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2019, 03:01:31 PM »
I'll grease it with copper when I reassemble it, but the wear is not in an area that would be regarded as a moving part. The problem is that the pin is only supported by sheetmetal. On the threaded end there is a nice thick steel disk, like a thick washer, welded to the pedal box which gives good support to the threaded end of the pin. At the other end, just under the hex-head of the pin, the hole in the pedal box is only the thickness of the sheet metal. This has cut into the shaft of the pin making it loose in the hole. If they'd made the pin a bit longer and added a nice solid piece of steel for the pin to pass through it would have been a lot better. The pin itself isn't too bad, it has some pitting in it, but the pedals don't seem to have excessive movement on it. I wouldn't have worried about it, if it hadn't had the groove worn into it.

Tim
1951 Morris Commercial J Type Van
1955 BSA C11G
1961 Morris Mini Traveller
1969 Triumph TR6R
1977 Leyland Moke Californian

Driving a Moke with a hardtop is like having a shower in a raincoat.

Pete Power

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2019, 04:25:51 PM »
Hi Tim,
I know your pain.
I had the same problem where the pin actually made the hole in the Pedal box oblong. The cause though was from the pedals not rotating on the pin, they had partially seized causing the pin to rotate.
I did weld my hole up with partial success, until a few years back I scored a new pedal box and replaced it.
Happy Mokin
Regards
Pete

1981 Californian 1275 Galv "Mighty Moke"

"Just because you're breathing doesn't mean you're alive!"

Tim

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2019, 04:54:02 PM »
Yeah, the hole is very slightly ovalised on mine, but i haven't bothered to weld it up, it wasn't too bad when I tested an un-worn section of the pin. The only real problem is where it cut into the shaft.

I vaguely remember pulling it apart several years ago and having a lot of trouble getting the pin out. It may have been seized on the pedals then. It came out fine this time. I had previously welded and re-drilled the clevis pin hole in the end of the clutch pedal and re-drilled it. It was a tiny bit worn but a new pin still fits reasonably snugly. I've basically replaced or repaired everything between my foot and the clutch pressure plate. Hopefully I can change gears again after this.

Tim

1951 Morris Commercial J Type Van
1955 BSA C11G
1961 Morris Mini Traveller
1969 Triumph TR6R
1977 Leyland Moke Californian

Driving a Moke with a hardtop is like having a shower in a raincoat.

Terry

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2019, 06:40:22 PM »
Hi,

the reason for the grooves in the pin or the oval hole in the mounting box is usually due to the pedals seizing on the pedals so each time you depress a pedal(s) some of the movement is transferred to the pin. You can sometimes see the pressing of one pedal moves the other pdeal and the pin will also rotate.

Terry
Cujo. 1999 - 2016

winabbey

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2019, 07:37:53 PM »
I wonder if they used copper grease on original assembly? A good dollop of that on the moving parts when assembling would surely help.
As mentioned in some recent posts it is the greasing of the pedals on the shaft I was referring to. ;)
« Last Edit: February 19, 2019, 10:54:41 AM by winabbey »

Tim

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2019, 12:39:50 PM »
In the end I couldn't get a replacement pin. Its not that they're hard to get, its that they are hard to afford!

Given that all the wear was just under the head, I made some washers to space it across so that an unworn bit of shaft is sticking through the hole. I had to make two washers, the same thickness, but differnt diameters. One has a large ID and goes under the head the other has an OD just smaller than the shaft and a 9/16" ID to fit over the turned down threaded end. This maintains the correct length of the thick part of the shaft in the pedal box. There was plenty of thread on the turned down end to still fit the nut.

Anyway, its now back together (with lots of copper antiseize grease Doug). I pretty much repaired or replaced every single part between my foot and the pressure plate, and now the clutch is amazing. I should have done it years ago.

Tim
1951 Morris Commercial J Type Van
1955 BSA C11G
1961 Morris Mini Traveller
1969 Triumph TR6R
1977 Leyland Moke Californian

Driving a Moke with a hardtop is like having a shower in a raincoat.

Drakman

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2019, 04:56:14 PM »
Ha, another job i am working on with mine as well.  Minikingdom have the pins on back order.  I resorted to removing the pedal box from the car because i couldn't get the old pin to budge, it pressed out ok though.

My pedal box was worn quite oval and the pin was worn away just under the hex head and to top it all off the PO had tried to remove it with a shifter and hammer by the look of it.

I welded up the hole in the pedal box and ran a bead of weld around the head of the bolt, turned it down in the lathe, fitted a grease nipple and now it fits tighter than when new!

I had to reshape the hex head as well thats why it looks a little crappy.


Cheers
Dave

Tim

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Re: Pedal pivot pin
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2019, 04:01:55 PM »
Nice one. If I had a lathe I'd have welded mine up too, but without one I didn't think I'd be able to grind the weld nicely enough to make it worthwhile. The grease nipple should make a difference.

Minisport have them, but $95 is a bit steep for a glorified bolt.

Tim
1951 Morris Commercial J Type Van
1955 BSA C11G
1961 Morris Mini Traveller
1969 Triumph TR6R
1977 Leyland Moke Californian

Driving a Moke with a hardtop is like having a shower in a raincoat.