Author Topic: Wheel Arch Rubbers  (Read 2742 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Steelo

  • Guest
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« on: June 11, 2007, 09:30:30 PM »
I've seen a supplier listed here or on Moke Werx for these rubbers but can't locate the reference. Can someone help me?

Terry

  • Custodian
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • ***
  • Serial Moke Offender

  • 15836
  • Location: Melbourne
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2007, 09:42:51 PM »
Steelo,

Straightline trimming were advertising that they were making them at one stage. Also heard one of the SA businesses were aslo doing them. And i have some front ones.

All are simply flat 5 ply, 6mm rubber cut to shape. They are not moulded, do not have the brackets, inner metal piece or the spacer on the top edge.

I have attempted to get rears done but no matter which way I try and work it  they come out at between $50-60 each and there is a reasonable capital outlay to get enough to be able to sell at that price.

The chance of getting new moulded ones, except NOS, is unlikely as most quotes are in the thousands for the moulds and you need 4 of them :-)

Terry
13: "I am the scariest number."
666: "No, I am the scariest number."
2020: "Hold my beer and watch this."

Cujo. 1999 - 2016

Tim

  • Standard
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 3813
  • Location: Hobart, Tas
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2007, 09:48:19 PM »
I heard that the UK club are trying to get moulds made up, they are reproducing a lot of rubber parts.

Tim
1951 Morris Commercial J Type Van
1955 BSA C11G
1961 Morris Mini Traveller
1969 Triumph TR6R
1977 Leyland Moke Californian

Driving a Moke with a hardtop is like having a shower in a raincoat.

sa mokin

  • Standard
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 2202
  • Personal Text
    Adelaide, South Australia
  • Location: Adelaide
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2007, 10:03:55 PM »
So Terry - is it a case of going to Clarke Rubber - buying a sheet of flat 5 ply, 6mm rubber - tracing the outline of my existing ones and cutting them out? I assume I have the brackets attached to the originals.


1980 Californian
1976 Moke  (CYM)
1972 Export Moke

Terry

  • Custodian
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • ***
  • Serial Moke Offender

  • 15836
  • Location: Melbourne
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2007, 10:11:16 PM »
SA mokin,

Sort of. Clarke rubber may have the type of rubber and then the answer is yes. Stay away from the glossy looking finish as it scuffs easy. I have been acquainting myself with the rubber fabricators of Melbourne and you can find different types.

The stuff I have used is a 'conveyor' belt type of of reinforced rubber sheet and I tested how difficult it is to cut on some off cuts. Seems hard to get a nice clean edge though. The type I use cleans up wheel with So EASY tyre cleaner or caustic soda.

I have also looked and laser, water and die cutting them also but for a one off set it it not worth it.

Terry
13: "I am the scariest number."
666: "No, I am the scariest number."
2020: "Hold my beer and watch this."

Cujo. 1999 - 2016

sa mokin

  • Standard
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 2202
  • Personal Text
    Adelaide, South Australia
  • Location: Adelaide
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2007, 06:20:39 PM »
Well.... I went to Clarke Rubber to find that they do carry 5 ply 6mm rubber of the non shiny type - by the roll which is 1200mm wide.

They also gave me some advice on how to cut straight - so we shall see how I go.

My Mrs. used to be a dress maker so here are the patterns she knocked up - she complained that the originals were not perfectly straight either - leasding me to believe that it wasn't an exact science when originally manufactured!



1980 Californian
1976 Moke  (CYM)
1972 Export Moke

Siddersc

  • Past or Inactive member
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 109
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2007, 06:31:42 PM »
Hey SA,
I also need a set of these, front and rear, would you like to sell me your off cuts, or even cut some out for me?, to reduce the cost to you?
I would like to catch up with you one day, as it seems you have some great ideas, and would love to see yor blasting cabinet in action. :wink:
Sid

1971 export resto

sa mokin

  • Standard
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 2202
  • Personal Text
    Adelaide, South Australia
  • Location: Adelaide
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2007, 07:27:30 PM »
Hi Sid

Yup - the sand blasting cabinet has become essential to restoring just about anything. I used silica bead (glass bead) instead of sand/grit/garnet as it is less harsh on the metal and leaves a nice frosted finish that paint adheres well to - oh and the best part - it takes the paint/rust away in seconds with no/little scrubbing/sanding!

I will let you know how I go with the wheel arches - I am cutting tomorrow - and will gauge by the amount of frustration and difficulty level before offering my services or parting with my 2nd hand arches. There is a little more to it - you will notice several little bar templates that mulitple copies need to be cut and glued together - then glued to the main flap.

While Terry was correct in saying the flap is flat - the bubble shape is created with the metal bracket/spacers that are apart of the whole assembly to the wheel arch - and are also used to keep the glued rubber bar spacers to the flap. Gave them a blast and a paint today as well.

Fingers crossed..... :lol:


1980 Californian
1976 Moke  (CYM)
1972 Export Moke

sa mokin

  • Standard
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 2202
  • Personal Text
    Adelaide, South Australia
  • Location: Adelaide
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2007, 08:37:51 PM »
Hi Sid

You are on your way to lots of fun - there are probably many places to buy bead/garnet but I bought my supply at Paramount Browns - Cavan Road - Cavan. I think the price is like $50 for a 25Kg bag of bead and a little less for Garnet.

Rubber gloves can be purchased Foodland and vinyl for the sleeves at Spotlight. (both have many locations)

However - the subject of this thread was supposed to be wheel arches - and I am happy to report success with some pics of my progress - I am trying a few different methods - and will reveal all in my "how to" article I am writing to post on the Moke Werx website.... stay tuned!
 :)





And not that it is finished yet - bit I had to do a temporary fitting to see if I was in the ballpark...



1980 Californian
1976 Moke  (CYM)
1972 Export Moke

Siddersc

  • Past or Inactive member
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 109
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2007, 11:26:42 PM »
Hey SA,
Those spats are looking great, was it as difficult as you first though to cut them out?
I will be making a set for my export when the time comes, but I don't have an original rear one to use as a template, do you think i could borrow one of you old ones to mark out, or even the template you made?,
can you also tell me the type of rubber you bought, and how much it cost?
Thanks
Sid

1971 export resto

sa mokin

  • Standard
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 2202
  • Personal Text
    Adelaide, South Australia
  • Location: Adelaide
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2007, 12:50:59 AM »
Hi Sid

Yes and no - the spats were relatively easy to cut out - it is the case of using the right tool for the job. The challenging/time consuming part was the easy looking rubber bar/spacers that are moulded to the face of the original ones. Being small and the cutting tool large - it was tedious but completed in the end.

And I suppose my quest for "as perfect as I can get them" slows the process down - I would be happy to share my templates.

I will spell it all out to everyone shortly - the type of rubber I purchased is called "Insertion Rubber" and you can get a nice set of wheel arches for under $200 and a couple of hours work. I can say it is definately a "two man" job (or husband/wife job in my garage) - the rubber is hard to manage during the cutting process.(heavy)

For fellow Moke owners wishing to add these spats to their wheel arches that did not originally come with them will have the added hassle of finding/creating the (3) front wheel/ (4) rear wheel  galv metal brackets that bolt in behind each spat - giving it strength and "bubbling the rubber out into shape" to deflect maximum tyre runoff.

I am wondering whether it would be worth getting these brackets fabricated by a local metal shop? Can anyone shed some light on the demand for the complete set? :idea:


1980 Californian
1976 Moke  (CYM)
1972 Export Moke

Terry

  • Custodian
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • ***
  • Serial Moke Offender

  • 15836
  • Location: Melbourne
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2007, 08:56:45 AM »
SA Mokin,

It is not as easy as it looks is it :-)

I am not quite sure how wide your rubber piece is, but I remember playing around with a lot of positions and found i could get the four pieces and the rubber strips out of a piece just a smidge over 1m.

I have CAD drawings and quotes from having the pieces of metal made out of stainless that I was going to use. There are a few different varieties of metal brackets also which confuses things a bit.

If there is enough interest I might be tempted to go chase it all up again and see what a set of everything might cost because as SA says it is few hour work, requires two and difficult to get a good cut.

And something else to keep in mind the radius is not the same on the curved leading edge. Also Export Mokes only have them on the front guards from what I can see so you hvae the extra hassle of getting the holes in the right place :-)

Terry
13: "I am the scariest number."
666: "No, I am the scariest number."
2020: "Hold my beer and watch this."

Cujo. 1999 - 2016

sa mokin

  • Standard
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 2202
  • Personal Text
    Adelaide, South Australia
  • Location: Adelaide
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2007, 07:33:53 PM »
Yes - as Terry says - not as easy as it looks - but not impossible - and as a fellow with limited "handyman skills" - I didn't end up too badly out of it.

I tried bonding the rubber spacers to the spat with aridite and had limited success so I came to conclusion that for no other reason than originality it is not required as the bolts and metal brackets hold it all together anyhow.

Here is the finished result - I did not put washers on for the photo as it is all coming back off for a paint job.






And for those missing there wheel arch spats or Mokes that were manufactured without them - here is a look at the brackets in use...


I ended up making my spacers with bonded pieces of rubber and with my wife's dressmaking skills - we managed to create a set and a half out of 1 metre of material (an extra 2 back spats for trade with a certain webmaster.......)

I hope to have them all finished and fitted this weekend and will post my results  :lol:


1980 Californian
1976 Moke  (CYM)
1972 Export Moke

Terry

  • Custodian
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • ***
  • Serial Moke Offender

  • 15836
  • Location: Melbourne
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2007, 07:46:30 PM »
Sa Mokin,

The rubber spacers are there to take up the space where the guard folds back under and you will find it gets a slightly better looking fit. Try a contact type adhesive or special rubber glue and you might have more success.

On the ones I have done we just drilled the holes and the bolts hold the spats and the spacers to the guard, no gluing required.

Terry
13: "I am the scariest number."
666: "No, I am the scariest number."
2020: "Hold my beer and watch this."

Cujo. 1999 - 2016

sa mokin

  • Standard
  • Registered Member

  • Offline
  • *

  • 2202
  • Personal Text
    Adelaide, South Australia
  • Location: Adelaide
Wheel Arch Rubbers
« Reply #14 on: June 15, 2007, 07:52:03 PM »
Sorry Terry - I didn't explain myself - I meant that the bonding to the spat is not required - I did not mean the spacer is not required - mine have all the required spacers and they are all needed.

Here is how I made them and the tool I used.



That is one of the difficulties in writing How to articles - making sure you are understood correctly! :lol:


1980 Californian
1976 Moke  (CYM)
1972 Export Moke