Author Topic: Tools For Mokes.  (Read 4239 times)

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Terry

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Re: Tools For Mokes.
« Reply #45 on: July 23, 2016, 09:01:11 PM »
Hi,

I had to make up some jacking rings today for my Moke so while I had the Jig my father and I constructed a few years ago I thought to take a photo.


The photo is from the second one I made today while the first one I would say was probably the best one I have managed to make with it being nice and tight on the donut, even right around so it sits flat and welding was pretty good also. :)

Terry
I'm not questioning your powers of observation; I'm merely remarking upon the paradox of asking a masked man who he is.


Cujo. 1999 - 2016

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Re: Tools For Mokes.
« Reply #46 on: July 24, 2016, 08:57:54 AM »
Terry why not put the jacking ring on the inside of the donut that way it's not trying to pull over the out side.
1973 moke the Boss
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Terry

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Re: Tools For Mokes.
« Reply #47 on: July 24, 2016, 06:52:50 PM »
Terry why not put the jacking ring on the inside of the donut that way it's not trying to pull over the out side.

On the inside has a couple of issues. For the donut the only 'edge' to stop them pushing further in is where the rubber is vulcanised to the metal base so it will either locate differently in each donut and probably tear away the vulcanising over time. On the sub frame there is already a locating ring for the inside edge of the donut so putting the JR inside would have it resting on that locating ring and prone to crushing or moving.

The thickness of the metal I use and with the tool pictured if I make them carefully like I did yesterday then they fit tight and don't slide up the side at all. The earlier ones I used to get via the MOA were much thinner and tend to adopt the shape of the donut over time and that stresses the weld and I had a few break.

Terry
I'm not questioning your powers of observation; I'm merely remarking upon the paradox of asking a masked man who he is.


Cujo. 1999 - 2016

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Re: Tools For Mokes.
« Reply #48 on: September 08, 2016, 08:55:15 PM »

Hope picture is attached.Used this the other day and thought i would put it up.Its a surgical clamp that locks.Had it for years in my toolbox..Every time i use it i think how handy it is.Forget where i got it.Made fitting the cotter pins and clips on pedals quick and easy.

Newie

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Re: Tools For Mokes.
« Reply #49 on: October 07, 2017, 05:09:11 PM »
Like many other shed dwellers of my generation, I had a set of oxy acetylene bottles sitting in the corner ready for a multitude of jobs for quite a few years and found them very handy from time to time. Like 99% of others though, I got rid of them about 15 years ago as both the gas and bottle rental prices went through the roof. Also MIGs have largely rendered oxy welding obsolete, especially when it comes to panel work. I would guess that most panel beaters under 35 wouldn't even know how to light the torch, let alone weld with one  ::)

A pity in a way, because I used to really like oxy welding, but you can't argue that the MIG leaves it for dead when it comes to speed and lack of heat distortion.

There are some times though, when a good flame would still be very useful, notably for heating (bending steel, shrinking panels etc) and also silver soldering (as opposed to soft soldering).

I have had a MAPP gas torch for probably 10 years and have found it useful for things like that, but only to a point. It's really only barely hot enough for silver soldering, not hot enough at all for bending anything thicker than about 1mm, and whilst I used it extensively just recently in panel shrinking operations and it does work, a more focused flame would have been much better.

If you're just heating (as opposed to welding or cutting) you can get an oxy/LPG set up which is much cheaper to operate than the oxy acetylene, but you will pay $400 or more for the kit and the hoses need replacing every few years, so for the amount I use it, it could never be justified.

The other option that has been around for quite some time is an oxy/MAPP gas kit using disposable cylinders, which is what my plumber uses these days, but when I looked at them a few years ago they were around $500   :o

Looked again more recently and was wavering when the Bunnings version dropped to $300, but didn't have the spare funds when I was looking.

When I called into SuperCheaap earlier in the week though, with a $30 club credit burning a hole in my pocket and saw a set on special for under $150, I had to take it home  8)



The bottle carrier is pretty flimsy, but to my mind the hoses, regulators and torch is what's importannt and whilst they are all pretty scaled down compared to a normal oxy set, they look to be pretty good quality. Time will tell I guess.

Will also be interesting to see how long the oxy bottle lasts. They say about 20 - 25 minutes with a welding type flame, which will be OK if it's true as I won't be doing any welding with it and will probably only need it for a couple of minutes at a time.

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Preferred ball joint splitter
« Reply #50 on: October 14, 2017, 07:21:23 AM »
Does anyone have a preference for the wedge-style splitter that you hit with a hammer, vs the type that you gradually screw down/open like a lever? I had one of the latter from Supercheap when I did the old Toyota's bjs and it simply stripped the thread. Better brand stronger? Or is the wedge more reliable -- albeit tricky to use in tight spaces.

Terry

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Re: Tools For Mokes.
« Reply #51 on: October 14, 2017, 09:32:45 AM »
Hi,

I use both and find the splitter/fork type it is hard to find them small enough to handle the Moke size ball joints and they tend to be harsh on the rubber boots.

I have two different varieties of threaded type. The style I think you are talking about from Supercrap are okay if they are fitted all the way into the cup of the tool, but if not they tend to snap. The other I have is a smaller more vertical unit and it good for the tight situation and is the one that has lasted the longest. I got it from a mini parts supplier years ago as it was the type they used.

Terry 
I'm not questioning your powers of observation; I'm merely remarking upon the paradox of asking a masked man who he is.


Cujo. 1999 - 2016

 

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